Moose Scat

Now this is what I’m talking about, when it comes to really good scat identification technique.

I’ve never seen one, but I hear there are some bobcats in our area.  But there are lots of things I’ve never seen, which is good, because there’s always something new.

As to scat flavor, I think I’d prefer vegetarian pellets, such as this moose scat I found during a hike on April 30, 2013, scattered in several piles within a five minute walk.  Either there was one very prolific pooper on the route, or a whole family.

These are large pellets, roughly half the size of a walnut.  A few of them would be a mouthful for anybody.  I wasn’t hungry enough.  (Click on any picture to get even more up close and personal with these darlings.)

This was our first walk in the new Cold Brook Public Use Area of the Sable Highlands Conservation Easement, on Standish Road in our home town of Saranac.  It is a tract of paper company logging turf, now available for public use under an easement to the state.

Not long ago I lamented that there was not much state land in the Town of Saranac, and some of it was hard to get to, even impossible in cases where parcels are landlocked by private property.  Not so any more.  The Sable Highlands and Chazy Highlands easements and purchases have put massive stretches of land into public use, right here in good old Saranac and half of our adjacent towns.

After the entrance at the state sign for the Cold Brook easement parking area, almost the entire logging road is densely overgrown with young birch and beech, and some balsam moving in.  There was not much mud and it was easy to walk through the dense growth of small trees, none more than about eight feet tall, and with no leaves yet.  It would be no fun in summer with leaves on these trees, crowded together just about one to every square foot of ground.  Maybe some day the state will rip a trail through it.

I enjoyed a nice view at the big logging opening at top of the trail.  With still no leaves on the surrounding trees (still just buds up in that high country), I saw a wide span of the Adirondack High Peaks to the south of us.  Buddy showed no interest in the view, even when I pointed it out to him.

On the way back down, we had a nice view of the southwestern portion of Lyon Mountain, an atypical view of it.  At the top of the trail I think it was the southeast portion of Norton Peaks looming large to the northwest.  Nothing special about those views worth picture taking.  This blog post is really just all about the moose scat, and I got carried away.

I’ve never seen a moose.  But now I know they are here in town.  I hope that some day one of them will visit Balsamea.  Then again, maybe not.  They’d eat too much.  As it is already, our over-populated deer herd browses too many precious things here.

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